Teen Suicide

The reasons behind a teen’s suicide or attempted suicide can be complex.  It often occurs following a stressful life event, such as a perceived failure at school, a breakup with a boyfriend or girlfriend, the death of a loved one, a divorce, or a major family conflict.  Although suicide is relatively rare among children, the rate of suicides and suicide attempts increases tremendously during adolescence. Suicide is the third-leading cause of death for 15- to 24-year-olds, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), surpassed only by accidents and homicide.

Suicide rates differ between boys and girls. Girls think about and attempt suicide about twice as often as boys, and tend to attempt suicide by overdosing on drugs or cutting themselves. Yet boys die by suicide about four times as often girls, perhaps because they tend to use more lethal methods, such as firearms, hanging, or jumping from heights.

Warning Signs in teens include:

  • Disinterest in favorite extracurricular activities
  • Problems at work and losing interest in a job
  • Substance abuse, including alcohol and drug (illegal and legal drugs) use
  • Behavioral problems
  • Withdrawing from family and friends
  • Sleep changes
  • Change in eating habits
  • Begins to neglect hygiene and other matters of personal appearance
  • Emotional distress brings on physical complaints (aches, fatigues, migraines)
  • Hard time concentrating and paying attention
  • Declining grades in school
  • Loss of interest in school work
  • Risk taking behaviors
  • Complains more frequently of boredom
  • Does not respond as before to praise

What Can Parents Do?

Most teens who commit or attempt suicide have given some type of warning to loved ones ahead of time. So it’s important for parents to know the warning signs so that kids who might be suicidal can get the help they need.

Watch and Listen

Keep a close eye on a teen who seems depressed and withdrawn. Poor grades, for example, may signal that your teen is withdrawing at school.

Ask Questions

Some parents are reluctant to ask teens if they have been thinking about suicide or hurting themselves. Some fear that by asking, they will plant the idea of suicide in their teen’s head.  This is not true.  It’s always a good idea to ask, even though doing so can be difficult. Sometimes it helps to explain why you’re asking. For instance, you might say: “I’ve noticed that you’ve been talking a lot about wanting to be dead. Have you been having thoughts about trying to kill yourself?”

Get Help

If your child is in immediate danger call 911.  If you learn that your child is thinking about suicide, get help immediately. Your doctor can refer you to a psychologist or psychiatrist, or your local hospital’s emeregency department can conduct a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation and refer you to the appropriate resources.

Contact Us

The Suicide Prevention Coalition of the Eagle Valley

Monday - Friday 8am-5pm
Phone: 970-748-4410
E-Mail: info@speakupreachout.org